Category:155mm Rifle M1918MI

From FortWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Fort Morgan 155mm GPF M1918M1
  • Shell: separate-loading, cased charge. 95 lb (43.1 kg)
  • Caliber: 155 mm (6.10 in)
  • Barrel length: 5.915 m, 19.35', 232.2"
  • Recoil: 1.8m 10° to 1.1 28°
  • Carriage: Mobile split trail
  • Elevation: 0° to +35°
  • Traverse: 60°
  • Rate of fire: 2 rpm
  • Muzzle velocity: 735 m/s (2,411 ft/s)
  • Maximum range: 19,500 m (21,325 yds) (12.1 miles)


155mm M1918 Gun and Carriage at APG in 2009


Contents

155mm GPF Background

Original M1918 Configuration with hand brake operator position on the limber

155mm GPF mobile guns were originally of French design and manufacture. The U.S. purchased a number (48) of the French produced versions and designated them as 155mm M1917 guns. The complete original system consisted of three major components (1) the M1917 gun, (2) the M1917 carriage and (3) the M1917 limber. Each component underwent separate modifications and emerged with changes to the nomenclature as outlined below.

The U.S. Acquired the rights to manufacture the French gun and assigned the 155mm M1918 nomenclature to the U.S. built versions. The M1918 system underwent the same modifications as the M1917 system and most of the components were interchangeable. The nomenclature changes were slightly different as outlined below.

155mm GPF M1918 in travel configuration with tractor pads

In 1940 there were approximately 973 serviceable 155mm systems mostly of the M1918M1 gun variety and many were deployed to coastal defense duty before and after the start of World War II. Many were towed from their storage locations by caterpillar tractors to distant costal defense sites and hastily built emplacements. Many of the emplacements were upgraded to include Panama Mounts. As the war progressed the need for the temporary 155mm gun emplacements diminished. Most of the temporary 155mm gun batteries were withdrawn in 1942-43 as new fixed gun batteries were completed and the threat diminished.

155mm GPF Carriages

  • M1917 - Original French carriages with hard rubber tires and hand brakes
  • M1918 - Original American carriages with hard rubber tires and hand brakes
  • M1917A1 - French made M1917 modified for roller wheel bearings, electric brakes, solid tires, etc.
  • M1918A1 - American made M1918 modified for roller wheel bearings, electric brakes, solid tires, etc.
  • M2 - Modified M1917 and M1917A1 including pneumatic tires, air brakes
  • M3 - Modified M1918 and M1918A1 including pneumatic tires, air brakes

155mm GPF Limbers

  • M1917 - Original French limber with steel spoked wheels on bronze bushings with solid rubber tires. Brake operator seat for operation of mechanical brakes. Designed to be horse drawn or artillery tractor drawn.
  • M1918 - Original American limber with steel spoked wheels on bronze bushings with solid rubber tires. Brake operator seat for operation of mechanical brakes. Designed to be horse drawn or artillery tractor drawn.
  • M1917A1 - Modified M1917 limbers with roller wheel bearings, electric brakes, and solid tires. Brake operator seat removed. Designed for "high speed" operation (tractor drawn later truck drawn).
  • M1918A1 - Modified M1918 limbers with roller wheel bearings, electric brakes, and solid tires. Brake operator seat removed. Designed for "high speed" operation (tractor drawn later truck drawn).
  • M3 - Steel disk wheels, heavy duty pneumatic tires, fifth wheel type steering, rigid axle and wheel spindles, and an A-shaped drawbar. Designed for high speed movement.

155mm GPF Guns

  • M1917 - Original French Gun
  • M1917A1 - French Gun with American spring operated breech mechanism
  • M1918 - American version of French M1917 Gun
  • M1918M1 - M1918 with American spring operated breech mechanism
  • M1920 - Built-up gun of nickel steel (prototype)
  • M1920M1 - Wire wound gun (prototype)

Sources:

  • Zaloga, Stephen, US Field Artillery of World War II, Osprey Publishing, 2007, page 20-22
  • TM 9-345, 155mm Gun Material, M1917, M1918 and Modifications, U.S. War Department, 1942
  • Handbook of Artillery including Mobile, Anti-Aircraft and Trench Materiel, U.S. War Department, Chief of Ordnance, May 1920, pages 229-244

Links:

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
content
Share
Google AdSense
Toolbox