Fort Saint Jean (1)

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Fort Saint Jean (1) (1914-1915, 1939-1945) - A Canadian fort established in 1914 during World War I in present day St-Jean, L'Île-d'Orléans RCM, Quebec, Canada. Named for the location. Abandoned in 1915 and restablished in 1939 during World War II. Abandoned in 1945. Also known as Fort Saint John and Saint Jean Battery.

Fort Saint Jean History

Part of the Harbor Defense of Quebec.

Fort Saint Jean was established in 1914 just as World War I began as one of four installations to control traffic on the Saint Lawrence River below Quebec City. Fort Saint Jean was located near the very small town of Saint Jean on the Isle d'Orleans in the Saint Lawrence River downstream from Quebec City. The other parts of the examination Battery system included Fort Beaumont and the two gun batteries at Fort de la Martiniere (Upper and Lower). The lower battery at Fort de la Martiniere was really the only one of the two used in an examination role. The upper battery had large caliber 7.5-inch guns put in place to counter cruiser class warships.

During World War II Fort de la Martiniere and Fort Saint Jean again worked as a team to perform the examination function. Fort Saint Jean provided a small battery of artillery (two 18-pounders on field carriages), a searchlight installation, an observation post and inspection boats. Inspection boats were not armed because they were supported by the inspection batteries of Fort de la Martiniere and Fort Saint Jean. The function of examination was to decide if ships can continue up river. Communications between the forts was by telephone and later by radio.

Current Status

No remains at St-Jean, L'Île-d'Orléans RCM, Quebec, Canada.


Location: St-Jean, L'Île-d'Orléans RCM, Quebec, Canada. (map point approximate)

Maps & Images

Lat: 46.927363 Long: -70.879583

Sources:

  • Le Fort de la Martiniere: Defenseur de Quebec, Association Des Artilleurs de la Garnison Inc., 1991, ISBN 2-980-2634-0-0, 96 pages (in French)

Links:

Visited: 22 Jul 2013


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