Battery Lincoln

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Battery Lincoln (1896-1942) - Battery Lincoln was a reinforced concrete, Endicott Period 12 inch coastal mortar battery on Fort Banks (2), Suffolk County, Massachusetts. The battery was named in G.O. 194, 27 Dec 1904 after Major General Benjamin Lincoln, Continental Army, who twice received the thanks of Congress for his services during the Revolutionary War and who was the first Secretary of War of the Continental Government from 30 Oct 1781, to November 1783, and who died 9 May 1810. Battery construction started 1892, was completed 1896 and transferred to the Coast Artillery for use 2 Sep 1896 at a cost of $ 78,394.86 (half of total cost of Battery Lincoln & Battery Kellogg). Deactivated in 1942.

Battery Lincoln Magazine Entrance
Battery Lincoln Mortar Pit B, Now a Parking Lot
Battery Lincoln Mortar Pit A, Now a Parking Lot

Endicott Period

Part of the Harbor Defense of Boston, Massachusetts.

Originally built as an Endicott Period concrete coastal mortar battery with eight 12" M1886 mortars mounted on M1891 mortar carriages. This was a single level mortar battery with the magazines on the same level as the mortar loading platforms. Shells and powder are wheeled from the magazines to the mortars on shot carts. No shell or powder hoists were provided. Electricity was furnished by an emplacement power plant.

In October 1904 there was an incident involving mortar #63, which was accidentally fired with its breechblock not secured. The blast blew away part of the muzzle of #27, and killed four crewmen. Mortar #27 was replaced by Model 1886-1890MI #9, specially made for this battery.

This battery was originally constructed with Rosendale cement and was expanded and reconstructed using Portland cement in 1912-1913. Cost of the rebuild was $ 96,620.00. All of the mortars and carriages were transferred to Fort Caswell, Battery Bagley, on 6 Nov 1911. Fort Caswell, Battery Bagley, transferred a different set of mortars back to Battery Lincoln on 12 Jun 1912.

Battery Lincoln Armament (edit list)
Empl
No
Caliber
Type
Barrel
Length
Model Serial
No
Manufacturer Carriage Service
Dates
Notes
1909 Armament List
A1 12" Mortar 120" M1886 61 Builders Mortar, M1891, #18, Builders 1896-1911 See note 1
A2 12" Mortar 120" M1886 72 Builders Mortar, M1891, #20, Builders 1896-1911 See note 1
A3 12" Mortar 120" M1886 41 Builders Mortar, M1891, #19, Builders 1896-1911 See note 1
A4 12" Mortar 120" M1886 63 Builders Mortar, M1891, #17, Builders 1896-1911 See note 1
B1 12" Mortar 120" M1886 23 Builders Mortar, M1891, #29, Builders 1896-1911 See note 1
B2 12" Mortar 120" M1886 26 Builders Mortar, M1891, #27, Builders 1896-1911 See note 1
B3 12" Mortar 120" M1886-1890MI 9 Watervliet Mortar, M1891, #30, Builders 1896-1911 See note 1
B4 12" Mortar 120" M1886 16 Builders Mortar, M1891, #28, Builders 1896-1911 See note 1
1929 Armament List
A1 12" Mortar 141.12" M1890MI 3 Watervliet Mortar, M1896MI, #216, Midvale 1912-1942 See note 2
A2 12" Mortar 141.12" M1890MI 41 Builders Mortar, M1896MI, #218, Rarig 1912-1942 See note 2
A3 12" Mortar 141.12" M1890MI 39 Builders Mortar, M1896MI, #217, Midvale 1912-1942 See note 2
A4 12" Mortar 141.12" M1890MI 37 Bethlehem Mortar, M1896MI, #219, Rarig 1912-1942 See note 2
B1 12" Mortar 141.12" M1890MI 8 Niles Mortar, M1896MI, #213, Midvale 1912-1942 See note 2
B2 12" Mortar 141.12" M1890MI 9 Niles Mortar, M1896MI, #212, Midvale 1912-1942 See note 2
Source: RCW Form 1, 1 May 1921, 21 Jun 1929, RCB, 31 Dec 1909 CDSG, Berhow, Mark A. ed, American Seacoast Defenses: A Reference Guide, 2nd Edition, CDSG Press, McLean, VA, 2004, ISBN 0-9748167-0-1, pages 134-135
Note 1: Mortars and carriages transferred to Fort Caswell, Battery Bagley, 6 Nov 1911. CDSG Gun Card Collection from NARA
Note 2: Mortars and carriages transferred from Fort Caswell, Battery Bagley, 12 Jun 1912. Mortars and carriages ordered salvaged 15 Dec 1942. CDSG Gun Card Collection from NARA


World War I

The U.S. entry into World War I resulted in a widespread removal of large caliber coastal defense gun tubes for service in Europe. Many of the gun and mortar tubes removed were sent to arsenals for modification and mounting on mobile carriages, both wheeled and railroad. Most of the removed gun tubes never made it to Europe and were either remounted or remained at the arsenals until needed elsewhere. Battery Lincloln was not affected by the World War I redistribution or the 1920s disarmament actions.

World War II

The six remaining 12" mortars of Battery Lincoln were obsolete at the beginning of the war and they were ordered scrapped 15 Dec 1942.

Current Status

Private property. Both mortar pits have been covered by sloping parking lots but the central structure appears intact, with entrances blocked. No period guns or mounts in place.


Location: Winthrop, Suffolk County, Massachusetts

Maps & Images

Lat: 42.3840431 Long: -70.9813115

See Also;

Sources:

  • U.S.Army, Supplement to the Harbor Defense Project of Boston, Massachusetts, (HDB-AN-45), 31 Jan 1945, CDSG

Links:

Visited: 10 Jun 2012



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