Carlisle Barracks

From FortWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Fort Calendar Fort Blogs

Carlisle Barracks (1757-1871) (1920-Present) - Established in 1757 by England's Colonel John Stanwix and was first used for instruction on Indian fighting in 1758. The first U.S. Army educational institution, an artillery school, was also established here in 1778. Over the years ten different Army schools were located here, including the Carlisle Indian Industrial School from 1879 to 1918. Also known as Fort Lowther, Camp near Carlisle and Washington Post. Active military installation and home of the U.S. Army War College.

Carlisle Barracks State Marker
1777 Hessian Powder Magazine at Carlisle Barracks
Frederick the Great Overlooking the Parade at Carlisle Barracks

Carlisle Barracks History

Used as the staging area for the attack on the French Fort Duquesne (1) by British General John Forbes in 1758 during the French & Indian War. Forbes constructed a road from Carlisle to Fort Duquesne (1) at present day Pittsburg and built a series of forts along the way to supply his troops and keep the communications lines open. The Forbes Road enabled General Forbes to get a force of 8,000 men to Fort Duquesne (1) and forced the French to abandon and destroy the fort.

In 1794 George Washington assembled 14,000 troops here to quell the Whiskey Rebellion (trouble over new whiskey taxes).

In 1863 the town of Carlisle was successfully held by 21st and 22nd New York Militia Regiments who withstood repeated attacks by Confederate forces led by J.E.B. Stuart. After burning down the barracks, the Confederate forces, though unbeaten, moved on to Gettysburg.

Current Status

An active military installation, home to the U.S. Army War College and the second oldest army post in the country.

Location: Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania.

Maps & Images

Lat: 40.21070 Long: -77.17162

Sources:

Links:

Visited: 19 Apr 2012

Carlisle Barracks Picture Gallery

Click on the picture to see a larger version. Contribute additional pictures - the more the better!

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
content
Share
Google AdSense
Toolbox